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Upcoming Events

 

Offbeat Tactics That Catch Trout with Ed Engle

 

    Every now and then the standard tactics that usually catch trout don’t work. For these special cases a nontraditional approach may be necessary for a successful day on the river. You might want to consider unorthodox tactics such as, instead of throwing streamers across a stream and letting them swing through the current, you cast them downstream, along the same side of the river as where you are and then strip them back upstream. Or using large, spent spinner imitations as attractor flies, or drowning terrestrial patterns, or actively fishing nymph imitations. Other uncommon tactics might include high-sticking dry flies, presenting standard attractor fly patterns in new ways or swinging dry flies on a tight line. The program you are going to see this month explains, as well as shows, the importance of on-the-stream innovation when you are faced with unusual or difficult fishing conditions. You’ll learn that having the ability to let go of all your preconceived notions often results in success and may ultimately carry over into a more thoughtful and innovative approach to all of your days on the water.

 

    Ed Engle has been an avid fly fisherman for the past 40 years and has fly fished throughout the continental United States, Alaska, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Canada and Europe for a variety of game fish species, but with a special emphasis on trout. He was born in Virginia, though has lived most of his life in Colorado. He got into fly fishing when he saw people catching fish using this method, expressed a desire to do it and was fortunate when his dad gave him a starter kit. Ed attended the University of Colorado in Boulder and graduated with a degree in biology. Living in Colorado, Ed has had ample opportunity to perfect his skills on all kinds of streams, using all types of flies. Today his home and office are just west of Colorado Springs, within 40 miles of the South Platte River, one of Colorado’s premier tailwaters.

 

    Ed’s fly fishing articles have appeared regularly in newspapers and magazines for more than 35 years. In the 1970’s, his articles on nymphing techniques were among the first to appear in national fly fishing magazines. Since that time he has taught thousands of fly fishers the subtle art of nymphing through his books and articles, on-the-water seminars and at his popular nymphing class sponsored by the Fly Fishing Show.

 

    Ed is especially interested in small fly tactics and techniques. His small fly research has taken him to many of the west’s famous tailwater and spring creeks across the country. He is also dedicated to fly fishing small streams for beautiful wild trout. Ed balances his interest in the “small side of fly fishing” with the avid pursuit of king salmon on the fly.

Ed is a regular contributor to the Boulder Daily Camera and Gray’s Sporting Journal. In addition, he has written for American Angler, Fly Fisherman, Fly Rod & Reel, Flyfishing & Tying Journal, Trout, Fly Tyer, Sports Afield, and Saltwater Fly Fishing.

 

    If we look at the books he has authored we can see yet another reason he is so qualified to lead us on this journey.  Ed’s most recent book, Trout Lessons (Stackpole, 2010), considers what to do when your usual fly fishing solutions don’t work. His interest in tying and fishing small flies led to the publication of Tying Small Flies (Stackpole, 2004) and Fishing Small Flies (Stackpole, 2005). The two-volume set is credited with helping create the current surge of interest in pursuing trout with small flies. Ed’s dedication to fishing bamboo fly rods resulted in the publication of Splitting Cane (Stackpole, 2002) which chronicled the life and craftsmanship of sixteen working rod makers. His first fly fishing book, Fly Fishing the Tailwaters (Stackpole, 1991), was a groundbreaking explanation of how to fish the regulated rivers found below dams.

 

    Ed’s current projects include writing posts for his popular, Lone Angler Journal blog, work on a new book, coming up with new small fly patterns,  and teaching at fly fishing seminars throughout the country.

 

    You can learn more about this very knowledgeable, skilled fly fisher and read his Lone Angler Journal by going to www.edengleflyfishing.com